What We Know About Slot Machine Banks

If you’re looking for a fun way to save all of your spare change, slot machine banks are a great addition for anyone’s room. Whether you want something small or a full size replica from the casino you lost money in, these novelty coin banks come in various sizes and a wide range of prices. For the price, you get all the bells, whistles, and jackpots of their real-life counterparts, without having to leave your home.

No, you do not need a permit to buy one. These are novelty machines, not the big time slots you play in Las Vegas. They do pay out jackpots, but only the spare change you put inside comes out. Casinos use tokens to control payouts and people that want to break inside them. The tokens themselves have no value at all once outside the building. Anyone dumb enough to cash them in will get a free ride from the local police.

For those who wish to but one outside the U.S., you can use coins from 98% of the world’s countries. This can be a good thing for businessmen and world travelers, who happen to bring back some spare change from their last trip. They won’t sort them, but you can at least stash them for later. Many slot machine banks have a spot in the back for you to empty the thing when it’s full.

You do get sound effects built-in, but they are battery powered. If you want, you can leave these out to save you from the pain of someone winning a jackpot. You can also find slot machine banks without the lights and sirens. They also have kid size models that are safe and quiet for children to have a little bit of fun saving money.

Depending on the size, slot machine banks come in either metal finishes or just the usual plastic casing. Sometimes it’s because of the size of the slot machine, but you can get small metal ones or large plastic ones. Either way, you get the same features in almost every slot machine bank.

You can expect to pay as low as $20 bucks, but the larger replica banks will run about $80. Each one is a bit different from the others, but their made to do the same thing: hold on to your change and take money away from your friends. You have to treat them like arcade games in your home.

Sure, you could use it as a cool looking bank, but why not have some fun and get it back the hard way? Some may think it’s rigged to keep it, but if you keep doing it over time, you can have an interesting way to save money and have extra for certain needs.

If you have already started creating a game room or “Man Cave”, slot machine banks fit right in with poker tables, bars, and pool tables. It’s a great way to add variety if you or your friends get bored easily or if they enjoy different things. Get a set of 3 or more and you’ve got your own neighborhood casino. Just make sure that the money stays within your circle of friends.

Antique Slot Machine – An Overview

Antique Slot Machines

There are collectors for everything, why not for slot machines? No, we’re not being facetious. In fact, slot machines make extremely interesting pieces because they are both decorative and functional. That’s right! An antique slot machine in mint condition or even in fine condition will most assuredly work. Of course, you’ll have to use quarters instead of nickels, but that no major hardship.

Who buys them? You don’t have to be a slot machine connoisseur to like the look an antique slot machine. In fact, many buyers are businessmen who are either interested in the history of the device or simply think an antique slot machine might make a nice addition to their office.

Other, more serious collectors have been known to devote entire rooms in their homes’ to slot machines. While they may call them game or billiard rooms, the slot machine is undoubtedly the star attraction.

Lastly, there are slot machine dealers, people who have spent their entire lives tracking down the rarest and most sought after models. While most dealers do indeed turn a small profit, they are normally only collectors at heart as they often have an antique slot machine or two that they would never dream of selling, for any price.

What to look for in an antique slot machine?

To begin with, you must make sure that the machine has been professionally appraised and that it is 100% original. Some dealers may try to avoid showing you documentation (probably because they don’t have it) and if they do, you should head for the nearest exit.

The reason that we are so untrusting is due to the simple fact that there is a lot of fraud in the antique slot machine market. Believe it or not, even reputable dealers will offer reproductions or reconditioned units for sale. While a reproduction is easy enough to spot, a reconditioned or remanufactured unit can be difficult.

What are they? Well, basically, they are slot machines that incorporate some original parts with some new ones. An apt analogy would be dinosaur bones. Yes, dinosaur bones! That is, when they do not have the all the original bones, often they’ll replace them will fakes.

As you might expect, these units are at best over-priced, at worst, blatant (yet undisclosed) thievery. That is why it is essential that buyers demand a certificate of authenticity. Honestly, we’ll say it again…do not purchase an antique machine without a certificate of authenticity!

If you are unfortunate or ill informed enough to purchase a reconditioned or remanufactured unit, in all likelihood you will have just blown a few thousand dollars! Though the unit may be aesthetically appealing and may be the perfect decorative piece for your home, office, or game room, the chances that you will ever recoup your initial investment are slim and none.

A Review Of Slot Machine

Like any other avocation or hobby, collecting antique slot machines is largely a labor of love. No, there isn’t a lot of money in it, and other hobbies, like art collecting or stamps, are undoubtedly more profitable and prestigious. But for those who fall in love with the one-armed bandit, there really is no substitute.

The History of Slot Machines

For those of you who are merely curious and don’t know the story of the slot machine in America, we are going to give you a brief tutorial. The slot machine was invented in 1895 by a mechanic from San Francisco by the name of Charles Fey. Few people know what inspired the industrious Mr. Fey to invent an entertainment machine when his business was the internal combustion engine, but nevertheless, he did!

His first and undeniably most popular effort was the Liberty Bell Slot Machine. It was a nickel slot that had three spinning wheels, each of them adorned with hearts, spades, diamonds, as well as the image of a cracked liberty bell. When identical suits or bells lined up, the player would win a small prize. Although it was nothing like the jackpots we know today. In fact, you couldn’t even call the top prize a jackpot with a straight face, as it was only fifty cents!

Even so, the machine was an instant success and Fey was able to quit his job and devote himself to making slot machines full time. Still, Fey was not able to keep up with increased demand as it seemed every bar and saloon in the area, and later the state, just had to get their hands on one of his machines.

Demand was so high for a time that Fey was able to negotiate an unheard of 50/50 split of all profits from bar owners who were renting his machines. Yes, renting. He did not allow establishments to purchase his devices, since then they would be able to keep all of the profits. It was a hard pill to swallow for local business owners, but since Fey was the only game in town, they could either take it or leave it. More often than not, they took it.

After several years of solo success, Fey was besieged by repeated licensing and manufacturing offers from businesses who wanted to produce their own versions of his famous machine. Time and time again he refused them, until finally a competitor by the name of Herbert Mills decided there was nothing stopping him from making his own machine.

Shortly thereafter, Mills offered his own machine, which eventually became the most famous version, as he substituted images of fruit (oranges, cherries, lemons) for card suits and Liberty Bells.